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Photo by Andrey Metelev on Unsplash

It can’t get any worse than this!

Phew! What a time. It is hard to decide what is most critical. When I think I have an idea to write about, another unprecedented event screams for comment. Years ago, I learned not to say it can’t get any worse. Life seems to show you worse after such a statement.

Political strife has been with us for a long time and continues to escalate. I fear the January 6th assault on the capital is not the last, nor the worse we will see. Political Strife on top of the pandemic that has killed 373,000 Americans, growing larger every day. Fifty-one million Americans are unemployed, and food lines like those of the great depression. Our nation is under great stress. For many Americans, it is about survival. …


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Photo by Alex Iby on Unsplash

Death stings less for a life well lived

It has been almost a year that the coronavirus has been such a large part of our lives. We hope that now that the vaccine is available, the impact will soon be past and life will become more than social distancing and masks. But today, it is the dominant influence in my life. It started as a virus that was killing people, many people. Then it was my friend and family that had covid19 but survived. This week it stuck closer. A life-long friend died two day ago. He was careful, wore a mask, stayed in, but luck was not on his side and a home repair man is the suspected contact. Another friend in his eighties was also sent to the hospital and because of his health, I fear he will not survive. He was another who was careful, but the virus found its way to his family. It is no longer a scary cloud, out there. It is here and personal. …


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Photo by Shiju Nambiar on Unsplash

Better decisions come from knowing the facts and options.

Here’s a big surprise — every day, each of us gets a little bit older. We don’t want to face it, but time is a thief who steals pieces of you as he passes. One of these days, he’ll take that piece that changes everything. We all know it, but we don’t want to talk about it.

Some of us are fortunate. We have a spouse or children who will step in when we fall, either literally or figuratively. Without planning, it will be harder for them, and they’ll not likely have the best options. …


A tale for Jesse James Godfrey

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Davis County Health Department

Tom was the son of a Merchant Douglas in Port St. Claire. He did not like working in his father’s shop because he didn’t like selling things. While his father was not happy about it, he let Tom spent some of his days exploring the hills and forest outside the port city.

It was Tom’s grandpa who first took Tom into the hills. Grandpa did not like buying and selling things either. Mostly, he was a fisherman. Also, Grandpa gathered fruits and berries to sell and do small repairs for the people of Post St Claire. He spent most of his time alone until Tom was born, and when Merchant Douglas said it was okay, he would take Tom on long walks around the island. He taught Tom to names the places he passed so that he always knew how to get home. …


Would you have gone?

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Photo by Walter Chávez on Unsplash

About 2020 years ago plus or minus thirty-three years, a child was born outside the city of Bethlehem. Today’s imagery of this event usually shows a wooden shed housing the couple with the infant in a manger. But most scholars think it was in a small cave. A cave is not far-fetched as the purpose of these sheds was to feed and provide some shelter for their animals, and if a cave was available, it is natural for the local herdsmen to use them.

Likewise, it is reasonable for the parents to put the child in a manger, a close approximation to cribs in size and shape. That they were there at all was due to unfortunate timing and no room at the inn. So far, these events are less than noteworthy. Few if any of the residences of Bethlehem would know of this event was occurring in the field just outside their city. …


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Photo by Dorothea OLDANI on Unsplash

Racism is about Power.

I read an article that defined Racism as the social norms, policies, and laws that result in one race being disadvantaged. It made me reconsider my feeling on the social discussion on race that is going on in America today. This definition is a different definition than I read in the dictionary, which said racism is the belief that race is the primary determinant of human traits.

Racism in America does not disadvantage white people. There are plenty of racial statements that are made against white people. All white people are racist is a good example. It is natural to generalize, indeed it is a characteristic of intelligence. …


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Photo by Sebastian Coman Travel on Unsplash

After a restless night, Jackson Burke opened his eyes. The changing light in the room indicated that the sun was rising. He knew that he would not sleep anymore. He reached over and turned off the alarm, two hours before it was to ring. He rolled over and sat on the edge of his bed.

“Today I’m going to the office,” he told himself, just as he had for the last three days yet failed to do. “Jane wouldn’t like me feeling sorry for myself,” he thought. …


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Photo by Chang Duong on Unsplash

The best world is one we all build together.

This year I have written more and read more diversely than at any time in my past. A large part is newspaper opinion articles. How is it that two conflicting opinions can both make sense to me? Or conversely, I object to both even though one favors a view I hold. What I’ve decided is that it is not the writer’s opinions but their connection to their opinions that interests me. Do I understand their point of view? Is it honest?

My views are not limited to my experience. White, retired, not poor, privileged in today’s words, my opinions are also valid outside of my experiences. So are yours. Though white, my opinion about racism is not irrelevant, nor are my ideas on feminism without merit because I am male. It is not the things that make us different that matters. It is the things we share, our humanity, that connect us. Everyone knows insecurity, feelings of persecution, unfair treatment, and being disadvantaged. Likewise, we all know the security of being with friends, the joy in the presence of those we love. It is how reading another’s story resonates with us, stirs our emotions, and informs us. …


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Photo by Masha Fathi on Unsplash

I have a secret that may be worth discovering.

If I do say so myself, I make a mean apple pie. But no one has ever called it the best pie they ever tasted. That prize most often goes to a grandmother long dead. Someone always says, “I think Cousin Louise has her recipe.” There is no competing with a memory from long ago. Why would you read about making an apple pie for someone who doesn’t make the best apple pie ever? Because I have a secret that may be worth discovering if you read on.

I’ve been making apple pie for about thirty-five years, roughly half of my life. My secret is not a magic formula or secret ingredient. I started cooking when I found myself living alone, with no wife or mother to handle the necessary life skills like planning and cooking meals or making desserts. Realizing my incompetence, I followed the advice of a woman at my church, advice she received from her mother-in-law when she was married. “If you know how to read, you know how to cook,” she told me. I immediately went out to buy my first cookbook. My apple pies recipe comes from that book. …


Is there Voter Fraud

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Photo by Markus Winkler on Unsplash

Voter fraud is a large part of today’s social commentary. It is more of a concern for Republicans with the president’s avoidance of concession. But people generally agree that there is some voter fraud. The question today, is it significant? Is it possible for a segment of the population to “Steal the election?” My opinion is no, but the truth is, I don’t know. There are gerrymandering and voter suppression, but those are topics for other articles. How much can we trust our election system is my question? Many have suggested that Trump’s attacks on the elections hurt America. But even so, it is a question needing an answer. With one hundred and fifty million votes, it is hard to think that there were no errors. I also believe that the states and people who participate in the elections are honest and well-meaning, or the great majority of them. I am too skeptical to think some people don’t cheat. Again, is it significant? …

About

Greg M Wells

Reader, writer, life-time learner, friend. Today’s ambition, increase kindness in the world.

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